Neither a borrower nor a lender of bandwidth be

“Neither a borrower nor a lender of bandwidth be; And this above all, to thine own site be true…”
William Shakespeertopeer – The Renaissance Man’s Guide to the Internet. – Chapter 1 verse 12

Yet here, readers! aboard, aboard, for shame!
Google sits in the shoulder of your site, And you are stay’d for.
There; my blessing with thee! And these few precepts in thy memory

See thou character set. Give thy tongue a name,
and no unproportioned content to his act.
For search engines shall look for UTF-8 and EN or DE
And provide translations thereof.

Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
For so shalt search engines stop, after discovering
Repetition of the evil seven.

Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them to thy site with links, trackbacks and pings;
For it is by the number of links to your site, that you are judged.
And it is through external links that you will grow.

But do not dull thy blog with trolls and spammers
Of each new-commenter, unfledged comrade. Beware
Links to their sites, are being in their name,
Bear them to Akismet that others may not burden thee.

Give every man thy ear, and seek their voice;
Take each man’s censure, by reserving your words.
Make thy habit to leave ideas for the voice of readers,
For participation, will buy their loyalty;

Choose a theme optimized for SEO as well as appearance,
For the apparel of a site oft proclaims the man,
And they in Google, of the best rank and station,
Are of a most select and generous chief in that.

Neither a borrower nor a lender of bandwidth be;
For loan of text oft weakens site rank,
And borrowed images dull load time,
Cease and desist will be their cry,
And DMCAs will be sent to thee.

This above all: to thine own site be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Farewell: my blessing season this in thee!

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Adhering to the GPL, here, you find the original:

LORD POLONIUS Yet here, Laertes! aboard, aboard, for shame!
The wind sits in the shoulder of your sail,
And you are stay’d for. There; my blessing with thee!
And these few precepts in thy memory
See thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue,
Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel;
But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
Of each new-hatch’d, unfledged comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,
Bear’t that the opposed may beware of thee.
Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice;
Take each man’s censure, but reserve thy judgment.
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not express’d in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
And they in France of the best rank and station
Are of a most select and generous chief in that.
Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all: to thine ownself be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Farewell: my blessing season this in thee!