SCuD – The ShortCode Disabler

When you add this plugin, a metabox is added to the edit post/page screens that allows you to disable ShortCodes in that one particular post/page. Admittedly, this plugin may not be widely needed by the general public. However if you are a plugin developer or documenter, you might find it very useful.

If you want to show examples of how to use a ShortCode and not have that ShortCode activate upon display of the post, this plugin will come to your rescue. The SCuD will disable all ShortCode processing for any post.

SCuD is written to prevent any collateral damage. After the post content is displayed, it activates the all previously disabled ShortCodes again. This allows any ShortCodes that you may be using in sidebar widgets to process correctly.

Download

Latest version: Download SCuD – The ShortCode Disabler v1.0.1 [zip]

Installation

Extract the zip file and just drop the contents in the wp-content/plugins/ directory of your WordPress installation and then activate the Plugin from Plugins page.

Changelog

1.0

  • Initial Release

1.0.1

  • Updated for current version of WP

Smart Passworded Pages

The Smart Passworded Pages plugin enhances WordPress by allowing the creation of central login pages that grant access to any number of passworded child pages. In this fashion you can give each client/member/organization a central place to enter a password and they will be taken to the page that has only their information.

The password field is displayed as a field followed by a button with customizable text. The form is can be uniquely stylized with CSS. The child pages can in turn link to other pages protected with the same password and the password will not need to be re-entered.

To add the password field to a parent page, simply enter the short code
[smartpwpages]

If you wish to assign a unique label to the submit button or give the form a unique ID for CSS identification, the attributes in the following example can be used:
[smartpwpages label=”Login” ID=”sppForm1″]

This plugin doesn’t add the ability to add passwords to pages. WordPress has that built in. On the right hand side of the page editing screen in WordPress, you can change the visibility to Password protected and enter in a password. If you are unfamiliar with using passwords in WordPress, you might want to read this page first: http://codex.wordpress.org/Using_Password_Protection

This plugin does make the password handling smarter and enhances it so that you can enter one password on a parent page and gain access to all the children pages using that password. If you don’t know what children pages or sub-pages are, you might want to read about it here: http://codex.wordpress.org/Pages#Creating_Pages

You can find out more about the Smart Passworded Pages plugin here: http://thecodecave.com/smart-passworded-pages-plugin/

Download

Latest version: Download Smart Passworded Pages v2.0.0 [zip]

Installation

Extract the zip file and just drop the contents in the wp-content/plugins/ directory of your WordPress installation and then activate the Plugin from Plugins page.

FAQ

Q. There’s no dashboard page for this plugin. Is it working? What do I do now?
A. There’s no need for options, just create a parent page that is NOT passworded and include the shotcode somewhere in the text: [smartpwpages]
Then create child pages that ARE password protected using the normal WordPress process for adding a password. It’s that simple. The user will be taken to the first passworded child page that matches the password the reader entered.

If you don’t know what children pages or sub-pages are, you might want to read about it here: http://codex.wordpress.org/Pages#Creating_Pages

Q. Your documentation doesn’t say how to enter the password into your plugin. How do you do it?
A. This plugin doesn’t add the ability to add passwords to pages. WordPress already has that built in. On the right hand side of the page editing screen in WordPress, near the top, you can change the “Visibility” value to “Password protected” and enter a password into the field that appears. Remember! Do this only for the child pages and not the parent pages!

If you are unfamiliar with using passwords in WordPress, you might want to read this page first: http://codex.wordpress.org/Using_Password_Protection

Q. I get a password prompt when I visit my page. I enter the password, then I see my page with the password prompt on it. What’s up with that?!?
A. You’ve password protected the parent page. Remember, you WANT people to see the page with the smart password prompt. Remove the password from that page and you’ll be fine.

Q. Can I put the smart password prompt in a sidebar or on the home page?
A. Yes, as of version 2.0. You still have to create a parent page and password protect the child pages. Then you can specify the ID of the parent page in the prompt.

In this fashion, you can create a central password page, or widget that takes you to multiple locations.

Here is an example of the contents of such a widget or page…

View Scores:
[smartpwpages parent=”491″ label=”Enter Team PW:” ID=”uniqueName1″]

View Team Notes:
[smartpwpages parent=”507″ label=”Enter Team PW:” ID=”uniqueName2″]

Q. Can I style my password prompts or the wrong password error?
A. Of course! You can even use the ID parameter on the short code change the ID of each entry form you use and make custom CSS for each.

Here is an example of some CSS that makes the entry field, button and password error message all really ugly…
(!! NOTE: There are slashes in the following text to make it appear correctly online. Do not include the slashes () in your css file !!)

p#smartPWError {
border: 4px solid red;
width: 258px;
padding: 5px;
background-color: aqua;
font-weight: bolder;
}

#smartPWLogin input[type=”submit”] {
background-color: coral;
color: navy;
font-size: large;
}

input#smartPassword {
display: block;
background-color: yellowgreen;
color: cadetblue;
margin-bottom: 12px;
}

Changelog

2.0

  • Updated to current version of WordPress
  • Addressed FAQs
  • Added ability to specify the parent form in the short code
  • Escaped some variables to make the shortcode more secure

1.1.7

  • Fixed another warning.

1.1.6

  • Fixed several warnings and possible version compatibility issues.

1.1.5

  • Fixed an error on the Invalid Password response

1.1.4

  • Updated header to 3.8.1 compatibility
  • Improved documentation
  • NOTE: Released on the same day 1.1.3 was publicly checked in. This made 3.6+ compatibility universally available.

1.1.3

  • Added 3.6 compatiblity
  • Improved internationalization
  • Added support for plugins that replace the default hashing protocol

1.1.2

  • Tweeked the Exclude Pages plugin compatibilty

1.1.1

  • The version labeled 1.1.0 hadn’t included my final fixes and did not work actually work with 3.4. 1.1.1 simply includes the code that was intended to be 1.1.0.
  • Updated the styling of the changelog section of the readme file to allow it to parse correctly on WordPress.org

1.1.0

  • Updated the plugin to include the security enhancements added in WordPress 3.4

1.0.1

  • Added compatiblity with the exclude pages plugin

1.0

  • Initial Release

Spam Catharsis

Catharsis. Definition: The process of releasing, and thereby providing relief from, strong or repressed [spam].

This plugin is not needed for a plain, vanilla installation of WordPress. However, if you have a plugin that replaces your commenting system, a plugin such as Intense Debate, your blog may be suffering from a build up of repressed spam. If left untreated, this could drive your MySQL server to a mental breakdown.

Certain plugins allow all comments to remain in your local database – even the ones that they themselves consider spam. On some blogs the spam comments can out number real comments a thousand to one. If the spam comments are never purged – this can create a real mess. If you have

Spam Catharsis was originally written in February of 2011 to provide a purging relief to a popular culture site that had built up several hundreds of thousands of spam comments – none of which were visible to visitors. It was only visible as their database grew and grew. Once the commenting plugin was removed, the dashboard of the site was nearly non-functional.

The Spam Catharis plugin operates on a daily basis removing from your database any spam comments that are more than 15 days old. The first purge that executes may take a while to complete, depending upon how bad your situation is. After the first run, the plugin embarks on a daily maintenance routine so to make your site operate as fast and efficiently as it always had.

There is no configuration. There is no option screen. Install it and you are done.

Download

Latest version: Download Spam Catharsis v1.0.1 [zip]

Installation

Extract the zip file and just drop the contents in the wp-content/plugins/ directory of your WordPress installation and then activate the Plugin from Plugins page.

Because this plugin can create an intense load on the database the very first time it is activated, it is recommend that the first install is done during off peak hours.

Changelog

1.0

1.0.1

Smart Passworded Pages Plugin

Here is a demonstration of how to use the smart passworded pages.

If you are unfamiliar with using passwords in WordPress, you might want to read this page first:  http://codex.wordpress.org/Using_Password_Protection

This plugin doesn’t add the ability to add passwords in posts.  WordPress does that all on its own.  You can see that here:

An image of the publish widget from the WordPress page editor.
On the right hand side of the page editing screen in WordPress, you can change the visibility to Password protected and enter in a password.

 

This plugin does make the password handling smarter and enhances it so that you can enter one password on a parent page and gain access to all the children pages using that password.

If you don’t know what children pages or sub-pages are, you might want to read about it here:  http://codex.wordpress.org/Pages#Creating_Pages

You can find out more about the current version of the Smart Passworded Pages plugin here:  http://thecodecave.com/plugins/smart-passworded-pages/

 

Now let’s get down to it.  First, watch this video about how to use the plugin:

(Press play and then click the full screen button on the bottom right for the best view.)

Now you can test how this plugin works.  Pay attention to the fact that you can enter multiple passwords on a single page and then end up in different locations within your website.  Test how it works on these pages:

http://thecodecave.com/smart-passworded-pages-demonstration-1/

http://thecodecave.com/smart-passworded-pages-demonstration-2/