A non-CodeGear patent application on “compiling” Object Pascal code?

I read in the Newsgroups today that there is a new patent that’s been filed that affects what Borland can do with Object Pascal.  According to this patent application, Mirkazemi; Aram; (Lindisfame, AU) ; Besharati; Shahram; (Kingston Beach, AU) would have a US patent upon producing JavaScript code from Delphi’s Object Pascal and several other languages

Who knows if this will fly, but the idea of restricting what a company can do with the product they’ve made is just….  irratating!

A key quote from the patent application:

9. A method for producing a web application that runs natively in a browser, comprising: writing in a high-level language to develop a source file; parsing the source file to produce a semantic map; and processing the semantic map by emitting browser-side JavaScript comprising at least one dispatcher having a set of parameters to invoke a code segment utilizing the same set of parameters.

10. The method of claim 9 wherein the high-level language comprises a high-level language from among the programming languages consisting of Ada, C, C++, C#, COBOL, ColdFusion, Common Lisp, Delphi, Fortran, Java, Object Pascal, SmallTalk, Visual Basic, and Visual Basic.NET.  

So, this program will take all Delphi source code and forms and convert them to a web app in javascript.

 First, I think it is hilarious to hear javascript described as a low level language, but that’s beside the point.

If Borland wanted to provide javascript as a target, as they do .NET and W32, they SHOULD be allowed to.  It is THEIR product.  They of course would have to do the work themselves, but it is a programming language they’ve made.  Why should they be restricted?  Especially when they’ve been nice folks and allowed programs like Free Pascal the benifit of the Delphi’s innovation.

 BAH!  It’ll probably pass with a rubber stamp of approval.

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